Repentance = Seeking God’s Mercy

first aidIt didn’t take long before I heard the groans of my students as I displayed, in bold, big letters, the word, “repent”. They were then asked to list other words that came to mind. Sin, embarrassment, bishop, confess, pain, mistake, unworthy, discouragement, hell, hopelessness were among the words most listed. There were a few who listed Atonement, Christ, joy, and change, but the overwhelmingly, most-picked words were negative and their comments certainly reflected that my students believed repenting was no fun. Read more of this post

Stake Conference Twitter Notes

twitternoteHere are my twitter notes from our Stake Conference held November 9, 2014. Sunday included a broadcast from SLC.

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There Is No Convenient Sacrifice

I’m sure it has to do a little with my age, but with every talk I hear from the Brethren there seems to be an increased sense of urgency. Whether it be in General Conference or other forums, Church leaders seem to be asking us to do a little bit more, to become more engaged in the work.

The message is simple; this is not the time to be sitting around, doing nothing.  Nor is it a time to be just a “Sunday” member, coming to church, but not allowing the gospel to effect our everyday life.  As Elder Maxwell put it, the time to come off the “porch of the church”[1] is now.  There is more to do and less time to do it.  And the Prophet has asked us all to do more.  Not only is he asking, but he is showing.  We must ask ourselves, as did Elder Ballard, “Are we keeping pace?”[2]   We must realize that we, the members of the church, will be required to do more and more, in other words, to SACRIFICE. Read more of this post

Lessons Learned – Part 2

"Family Council" Debriefing after activity.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is Part 2 of a two part post. Click for Part 1

4. Give them a seat at the table. An opportunity to lead.

One of the most impactive ingredients for our youth conferences was allowing, even empowering our youth to help plan and carry them out. They had real input into what would be taught and discussed. I have multiple examples of going into planning meetings thinking I knew exactly what I wanted done for a specific event only to leave the same meeting having changed or at least adjusted the event because of the input of the youth. They know what they need, we just need to listen.

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